Jean Ann Larson Recertifies as a TriMetrix HD Analyst

For Immediate Release – December 8, 2015


Carrollton, Texas, December 8, 2015– Dr. Larson recently received a certificate of achievement for successfully completing the recertification training for the TriMetrix HD® System.  She is now entitled to use the designation Certified Professional TriMetrix HD Analyst.  This is one of several certifications that Dr. Larson maintains through TTI Success Insights.  She notes that as an executive coaching and executive development professional, it is important that she has a suite of tools that can help executive leaders develop their skills and abilities to work together.


TTI Success Insights is the world’s leading source for research-based, validated assessment and coaching tools. Since 1984 they’ve developed their own patented solutions and products to support the discovery, engagement, advancement and performance of leaders, teams and individuals.


Jean Ann Larson & associates is a boutique consulting practice focused on leadership and executive development for the healthcare C-suite through speaking, facilitation, writing and executive team development and executive coaching.


Contact: Dr. Jean Ann Larson

Phone: (800) 823-4330 – Email: info@jalarson.net

Jean Ann Larson Named Next Wave Connect Top 10 Influencer in Healthcare Collaboration

For Immediate Release – December 8, 2015


Carrollton, Texas, December 8, 2015– Dr. Larson was named as one of the Top 10 Influencers in Healthcare Collaboration for her contributions as a thought leader in healthcare social media.  She is an advisory council expert in the Management Engineering and Change Management Community in Next Wave Connect.  Per Joanna Woerner of Next Wave, “Jean Ann has been named a Top Influencer in Healthcare Collaboration! This is an honor we bestow on the community leaders in Next Wave Connect who drive conversations and promote the dissemination of knowledge.”


Next Wave Connect is a social media platform allowing healthcare organizations and societies to share meaningful ideas and information amongst healthcare leaders.


Jean Ann Larson & associates is a boutique consulting practice focused on leadership and executive development for the healthcare C-suite through speaking, facilitation, writing and executive team development and executive coaching.


Contact: Dr. Jean Ann Larson

Phone: (800) 823-4330 – Email: info@jalarson.net

Dr. Larson’s Book Named Book of the Year by HIMSS

For Immediate Release – December 8, 2015


 

Carrollton, Texas, December 8, 2015–Dr. Larson is excited to announce that her book, Organizational and Process Reengineering Approaches to Health Care Transformation has been selected as the 2015 Healthcare and Management Systems Society’s (HIMSS) Book of the Year.  The Book of the Year Award honors a book that offers outstanding practical guidance and strategic insight for healthcare information and management systems professionals.

Criteria for selection of this book include:

  • Relevance to a broad range of industry professionals
  • Relevance of subject and content
  • Timeliness of content

This book provides significant contributions to the field with content that is new, provocative and provides alternative thoughts and approaches to healthcare transformation.

Dr. Larson will receive her award and be recognized at the HIMSS Awards Gala on March 3, 2016 in Las Vegas.


The Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS) is a nonprofit organization whose goal is to promote the best use of information technology and management systems in the health care industry.


Jean Ann Larson & associates is a boutique consulting practice focused on leadership and executive development for the healthcare C-suite through speaking, facilitation, writing and executive team development and executive coaching.


Contact: Dr. Jean Ann Larson

Phone: (800) 823-4330 – Email: info@jalarson.net

Dr. Larson achieves Life Fellow designation from the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society

For Immediate Release – November 2, 2015


Dr. Larson achieves Life Fellow designation from the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS)

Carrollton, Texas, November 2, 2015– Dr. Larson was recently notified that she has been designated a Life Fellow in the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society. Per Magdalene Van Vossen, Manager, Professional Development, at a recent board meeting, the Board of Directors of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society approved Dr. Larson’s advancement to Life Fellow Member status. This designation indicates the professional status and advancement within the professional society. It is an honor bestowed in recognition of long-term service and professional participation in HIMSS.


Jean Ann Larson & associates is a boutique consulting practice focused on leadership and executive development for the healthcare C-suite provided through speaking, facilitation, writing and executive team development and executive coaching.


Contact: Dr. Jean Ann Larson

Phone: (800) 823-4330 – Email: info@jalarson.net

Dr. Larson to speak at the NIHCL Education Executive National Learning Network, October 14, Winston-Salem, NC

For Immediate Release – October 12, 2015


Dr. Larson to Speak at the NIHCL Education Executive National Learning Network. October 14 in Winston-Salen, North Carolina

Her topic is “Leading Your Team through Challenging Times”

Carrollton, Texas, October 12, 2015 – Dr. Larson will address healthcare learning executives this Wednesday, October 14th sharing insights on how to effectively lead teams through difficult challenges.  The session will include her change readiness assessment allowing participants to appreciate their change readiness profile and how they can leverage their strengths to better lead their teams through change.  The workshop will conclude with a list of practical tips and best practices for leading change in challenging times.


Jean Ann Larson & associates is a boutique consulting practice focused on leadership and executive development for the healthcare C-suite provided through speaking, facilitation, writing and executive team development and executive coaching.


Contact: Dr. Jean Ann Larson

Phone: (800) 823-4330 – Email: info@jalarson.net

Growing Your Business or Organization: 5 Things to Avoid

Growing the business is arguably one of a leader’s biggest challenges.  But the real challenge is doing it cost effectively without losing key talent.  At the same time, it is critical to rally the organization’s stakeholders around the vision even it seems that the company will come undone by the pace of change.  Here are 5 things that you should beware of as your company grows rapidly:

  1. First of all, and counter to your intuition and perhaps the desperation you may be feeling as your company begins to grow rapidly, adding people will not solve your problems and miraculously handle your workload. If anything, the more people you add to the firm, the more complexity you bring in. Plus it can be expensive and add to the chaos.
  2. Don’t assume that because you have a brilliant strategy that you are home free. As the old cliché says, “culture eats strategy for lunch.” If you are not managing culture and don’t have the right team, your strategy is not worth the paper it is written on.
  3. Don’t get so busy working in the business that you don’t work on the business. Are you letting important issues slides simply because you don’t have time to discuss them with your team, let alone take the time to resolve them? This is a case of “pay me now, or pay me later.” You can handle issues before they become crises or spend your whole time battling those crises.
  4. Make sure that in your haste to get more sales, you don’t neglect your people or your processes. Talented people and solid processes will keep your business successful and help you grow.
  5. Last, but not least, make sure that you have the leadership skills and competencies to continue to lead your company into its bigger future. Just as you need to develop your business, you must continuously learn and grow your capabilities.

In the midst of managing the day-to-day business, consider these questions as you work on your business.

How well do you feel you as a leader:

  1. Have a common, compelling vision?
  2. Are able to effectively execute and implement the vision?
  3. Have a practical plan to grow the organization in a cost effective manner?
  4. Are able to identify critical issues before they become screaming emergencies?
  5. Are able to make decisions quickly and effectively?
  6. Are able to drive projects, while engaging and developing people and improving processes?
  7. Have a strategic plan that engages every single employee in the company?
  8. Have leaders who are able to adapt to the needs of the organization as it grows?
  9. Have the ability to surface and discuss difficult issues?
  10. Are completely satisfied with your current strategic plan?

These questions will provide insight on where you might want to continue to work on the business while you work in the business.

What if you as a leader could grow your organization or business cost effectively and with less, turnover and chaos.  What if you were able to engage and rally all your employees around your vision for the organization and execute on your strategy? Jean Ann Larson & associates help individuals, leadership teams and organizations successfully transform themselves while growing their businesses. Executive, team and employee development are our areas of specialization. We use cutting edge diagnostic tools and facilitation methods to deliver effective results and improved outcomes.  Contact us today at 800-823-4330 to learn how you can grow your organization while improving your business results.

 

September 2015 Newsletter

Check out my September Newsletter: Leadership: The Secret Sauce? Managers not MBAs, Beware of Assessments, and more  Jean Ann Larson September Newsletter

Leadership: The Secret Sauce for Organizational Success?

With many articles, books and all the hype about leadership, why am I calling Leadership the Secret Sauce?  As organizational leaders we are often looking for the next “shiny” thing whether that “shiny thing” is a new methodology, new technology, philosophy or even a newly emphasized competency or character trait.  What I have seen in my career is that no matter the approach, the solution or the new skill set, the quality of leadership and how leaders lead will determine the success or failure of the initiative.

Let’s take a couple of examples such as Lean or process improvement. You can fill in other words if you’d like, e.g. supply change management, ERP, Six Sigma, etc.  What these examples of approaches, philosophies and methodologies all have in common is that are powerful and they work. However, what often happens is that in many organizations they do not deliver their full potential value.  How does it happen time and time again that leaders don’t seem to get it? What does it look like?

  1. Leaders brought the approach or methodology in because that is what everyone else was doing – It’s the “thing to do” syndrome
  2. Leaders sanctioned organization-wide training on the new approach but it remained separate from the core business activities and strategies
  3. The approach was listed as a stand-alone strategy NOT an enabler to key strategy
  4. Leadership was supportive while it initially seemed to work. Once the going got tough, they quickly focused elsewhere.
  5. No changes to organizational structure or job design were made to accommodate the new approach and take advantage of the benefits – Basically nothing changed other than a new overlay of complexity and busyness.
  6. Once there were any challenges to the status quo with the new methodology, it was allowed to die a slow death.
  7. When someone new comes into the company and recommends that the approach be implemented again the response is, “We tried that before but it didn’t work here.” No wonder!

As a young process engineer, I was easily mesmerized by the power of Deming’s plan-do-study-act methodology as well as process redesign, lean, six sigma and countless other methods, approaches and philosophies.  I was even fortunate enough to see many of them be very successful.  Looking back over the years I realize that it wasn’t the wonderful approach, the brilliant team or my finely honed skills as a facilitator 😉 that led to success. It was ultimately the depth and breadth of the executives’ leadership sensibilities and capabilities.  Were they 100% behind the approach? Did they see it as integral to the organization achieving its mission and strategy and ultimately its success? Were they willing to support it during the dark days and doldrums that always come once the excitement and newness have worn off?

In my latest book, Organizational and Process Reengineering Approaches for Health Care Transformation, I devote as many pages to the role of leaders and organizational culture as I do to a methodology.  I purposefully stayed methodologically agnostic, e.g. I am not proposing any one approach over another. I’ve come to realize the simpler the better. The key is engaging the leaders. And actually they should be engaging us!  It is after all their initiative and responsibility.

Are You a Strategic Thinker?

Are you a strategic thinker? Strategic thinking involves analyzing opportunities and problems from a broad perspective while understanding how certain decisions and actions might have an impact on other options and outcomes.  How do you know if you are a strategic thinker?  You might be a strategic thinker if you:

*        Are curious

*        Are flexible

*        Are future-focused

*        Have a positive outlook

*        Are open to new ideas

*        Work to broaden your knowledge and experience

*        Are able to “connect the dots.”

How do you rate? What are your strengths? Areas for improvement?

Strategy as Planned Change

The 50+ leaders I interviewed about top challenges and critical leadership competencies for the future all noted there is a growing need to effectively deal with the increasing amount of change impacting us while leading ever more complex organizations. They also mentioned the need for leaders to develop strong strategic thinking skills.  I would argue that the two go hand-in-hand and that strategy is nothing more or less than “planned change.”

Why do you develop a strategy?  Whether you are part of a Fortune 500 organization or a sole proprietor, you want to take your company from point A to point B – with point B being your organization’s vision.  In between points A and B is a gap of what you need to do or change in order to reach that vision. Thus organizational change requires a strategy as much as strategy requires organizational and behavioral change.

So what is strategy? One definition states, “Strategy is about positioning an organization for sustainable competitive advantage. It involves making choices about which industries to participate in, what products and services to offer, and how to allocate corporate resources. Its primary goal is to create value for shareholders and other stakeholders by providing customer value.” (De Kluyver & Pearce, 2011).  The late Warren Bennis noted that “leadership is the capacity to translate vision into strategy” or the ability to lead planned change.

This all seems fairly simple and straightforward.  However, I see many people try to turn strategy development into both a science and art project making it very complicated in an effort to make it all things to too many people.  I argue that if it takes you 30+ minutes or a PowerPoint presentation to describe your strategy, it is too complex and is in danger of being permanently shelved in a back corner in the executives’ offices where so many well-meaning strategies go to die.

So how can we simplify strategy?  I suggest going back to the basics by considering Peter Drucker’s Five Most Important Questions. Those questions are:

  1. What is our mission?
  2. Who is our customer?
  3. What does the customer value?
  4. What are our results?  Or what results and outcomes are we wanting?
  5. What is our plan?

Let me know how your strategy as planned change efforts are moving forward.